The Curious Autodidact

June 24, 2015

Recycled Posting: Studying the Japanese American Internment

Filed under: book related,cool internet stuff,media related — Honilima @ 2:51 am

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I heard a podcast of Kiyo Sato talking about her book Kiyo’s Story: A Japanese-American Family’s Quest for the American Dream, and she sounded so young telling her family’s story I couldn’t believe she was a senior citizen. Her talk was lively and candid. She told of how she did presentations to school children so that this ugly piece of American history will not be forgotten. Her book is highly recommend.

If like you this book gets you more curious about the history surrounding Executive Order 9066 exploring it further using the many on-line resources about the WWII Internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans including this annotated list of materials.

There’s a digital archive of photos out of University of California that are amazing to browse.  Here’s recent radio show from NPR’s affiliate KUOW featuring stories from internment in Minidoka.

Out of Seattle’s International District comes the nonprofit
Densho, a Japanese term meaning: “to pass on to the next generation,” or to leave a legacy. This extensive project includes 500 hours of oral history and over 8000 visual images. Check it out and  learn what this experience was like for so many law-abiding citizens whose stories should be honored and remembered.

Nikkei: persons of Japanese ancestry
Issei: First generation Japanese immigrants to America. Federal law prevented them from becoming naturalized citizens until 1952.
Nisei: Second generation, born in the U.S. and citizens by birth.

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